Monday, June 23, 2014 Monday, August 5, 2013
People often say ‘stop being angry and educate us’, not understanding that the anger is part of the education.
Monday, January 23, 2012
A white college student from a private college goes into a poor neighborhood and volunteers four hours a week and that’s considered exemplary. [Whereas] a poor kid who lives in that community and takes care of all the kids in that neighborhood four hours every day is not seen as a volunteer.

Dr. Patricia Hill Collins quoting Public Allies CEO Paul Schmitz in her talk Answering the Call to Community Service. (via sexartandpolitics)

A microcosm of one of the fundamental issues with the non-profit industrial complex.

(via myflagisblackandred)

Ah, activist tourism… Whether it’s in the local sphere or international, it’s just as terrible.

Sunday, January 15, 2012
There is a disturbing trend happening across the country,and we can now add one more casualty to the list of Things-That-Shouldn’t-Be-Illegal-But-Are: condoms. Though condoms themselves are not illegal,in many cities they can be used as the basis for police harassment and arrest or as evidence of prostitution in court. In New York City, Washington DC and San Francisco, police are using the number of condoms women are carrying to justify profiling them as prostitutes, and even to bolster an arrest on charges of sexual solicitation.

From: Arrested for Carrying Condoms? - NC Harm Reduction Coalition on Daily Kos, 1/13/12

Criminalizing condoms totally undermines public health.

(via harmreduction)

Thursday, January 5, 2012
theillustratednerdgirl:

strugglingtobeheard:

ethiopienne:

steviemcfly:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

theoceanandthesky:

[tw: racism, bombs, explosions]
witchsistah:

queennubian:

socialsociety:

BLACK WALL STREET is not a record label started by The Game.
 Black Wall Street was the most prosperous black community in America during the 1920’s located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It was known as “Little Africa” or “Black Beverly Hills”, a prime example of racial nationalism. To put into perspective of how money flowed in Black Wall Street, a dollar took 365 DAYS to leave the community, now a dollar leaves an African American Community every 15 MINUTES. The community had hundreds of businesses all negro owned and their motto was “To educate every child”. 
 June 1, 1921 white supremacists bombed BLACK WALL STREET and killed over 3000 people and destroyed over 600 businesses. 21 churches, 21 restaurants, 30 grocery stores, a hospital, bank, post office, and most schools were destroyed. The dead were buried in unmarked graves. It wasn’t till 1997 that Oklahoma decided to pass the “1921 Race Riot Reconciliation Act” which provided decedents of that area a free college education.
SMH AT AMERICAN HISTORY

 READ THIS. They for sure aren’t teaching this in school. Tell your babies. Share with your students.

For all those “BOOTSTRAPS” bastards.


reblogging for history that i was never taught

As many people were killed that day as on 9/11 and this is the first I’ve heard of it.

Reblogging again for that last comment because I’m in the same boat. I had NEVER heard of this before, and the numbers are the same. I wonder why that is.

And this isn’t the only place something like that happened. 

I went to Booker T. Washington H.S. in Tulsa, OK, one of the few buildings that survived the riot, and I feel like this was mentioned maybe once, and incredibly briefly. Nobody wants to talk about this shit. If you try to look back and find old articles about it, you’ll find they’ve been expunged from those old (white-owned) newspapers. And the original reported death toll was something like 26 black people and 13 white people, which is ridiculous. They buried people in mass graves. They dropped bombs on them. They rounded up Greenwood residents at gunpoint and put them in detention centers, some say for protection, but not everybody believes that. Although, with white rioters out committing murder, burning every building in sight and looting businesses and homes, Greenwood was suddenly the least safe place ever to be a black person. Dr. A.C. Jackson was one of the most prominent black physicians in America at the time and he was shot outside his house.
And nobody wants you to know how many people died. The official death toll is still 39. But I’ve read 300, 3000, 3900. Thousands of people were rendered homeless. And the Greenwood district is still there, but it’s no thriving community.
And you know what started it? Aside from a white girl shrieking and a black guy running away? The newspapers ran a story about how there was gonna be a lynch mob outside the courthouse. And the shit of it is, there doesn’t seem to be any indication that there was going to be a lynch mob before the story ran. 
But I guess the sick and disgusting truth of it is if hadn’t been that newspaper story it probably would have been something else. At the time of the riot, Tulsa had 3200 Klan members and a thriving black community who dared to succeed in life. Seriously, there were some black people in town who had more money than some white people that was what fueled so much of the violence and looting. How dare they.

To quote above, reblogging for the history I was never taught.

theillustratednerdgirl:

strugglingtobeheard:

ethiopienne:

steviemcfly:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

theoceanandthesky:

[tw: racism, bombs, explosions]

witchsistah:

queennubian:

socialsociety:

BLACK WALL STREET is not a record label started by The Game.

 Black Wall Street was the most prosperous black community in America during the 1920’s located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It was known as “Little Africa” or “Black Beverly Hills”, a prime example of racial nationalism. To put into perspective of how money flowed in Black Wall Street, a dollar took 365 DAYS to leave the community, now a dollar leaves an African American Community every 15 MINUTES. The community had hundreds of businesses all negro owned and their motto was “To educate every child”. 

 June 1, 1921 white supremacists bombed BLACK WALL STREET and killed over 3000 people and destroyed over 600 businesses. 21 churches, 21 restaurants, 30 grocery stores, a hospital, bank, post office, and most schools were destroyed. The dead were buried in unmarked graves. It wasn’t till 1997 that Oklahoma decided to pass the “1921 Race Riot Reconciliation Act” which provided decedents of that area a free college education.

SMH AT AMERICAN HISTORY

 READ THIS. They for sure aren’t teaching this in school. Tell your babies. Share with your students.

For all those “BOOTSTRAPS” bastards.

reblogging for history that i was never taught

As many people were killed that day as on 9/11 and this is the first I’ve heard of it.

Reblogging again for that last comment because I’m in the same boat. I had NEVER heard of this before, and the numbers are the same. I wonder why that is.

And this isn’t the only place something like that happened. 

I went to Booker T. Washington H.S. in Tulsa, OK, one of the few buildings that survived the riot, and I feel like this was mentioned maybe once, and incredibly briefly. Nobody wants to talk about this shit. If you try to look back and find old articles about it, you’ll find they’ve been expunged from those old (white-owned) newspapers. And the original reported death toll was something like 26 black people and 13 white people, which is ridiculous. They buried people in mass graves. They dropped bombs on them. They rounded up Greenwood residents at gunpoint and put them in detention centers, some say for protection, but not everybody believes that. Although, with white rioters out committing murder, burning every building in sight and looting businesses and homes, Greenwood was suddenly the least safe place ever to be a black person. Dr. A.C. Jackson was one of the most prominent black physicians in America at the time and he was shot outside his house.

And nobody wants you to know how many people died. The official death toll is still 39. But I’ve read 300, 3000, 3900. Thousands of people were rendered homeless. And the Greenwood district is still there, but it’s no thriving community.

And you know what started it? Aside from a white girl shrieking and a black guy running away? The newspapers ran a story about how there was gonna be a lynch mob outside the courthouse. And the shit of it is, there doesn’t seem to be any indication that there was going to be a lynch mob before the story ran. 

But I guess the sick and disgusting truth of it is if hadn’t been that newspaper story it probably would have been something else. At the time of the riot, Tulsa had 3200 Klan members and a thriving black community who dared to succeed in life. Seriously, there were some black people in town who had more money than some white people that was what fueled so much of the violence and looting. How dare they.

To quote above, reblogging for the history I was never taught.

Wednesday, December 21, 2011 Tuesday, December 6, 2011

White Feminists: It’s Time to Put Up Or Shut Up on Race

ancestryinprogress:

Listen up, white feminists.

We have a problem.  I’m including myself because none of us are immune from this problem.  We all fuck up.  And you can say “fucking up is natural,” and that’s true, but it’s time for us to start identifying our fuck ups, and not just learning from them, but acknowledging the hurt they cause other people.

We need to acknowledge that we cannot know what it’s like to be an oppressed racial minority.  Cannot.  The end.  Period.  We don’t know because we’re queer, because we’re disabled, because we’re Jewish, because we were the nerdy kid in school.  These things may have hurt us severely, but we need to stop playing Oppression Olympics and acknowledge that when we’re talking about race we Do.  Not.  Know.  No more metaphors.

We need to accept that when a person of color tells us we’ve fucked up, the answer is not to get defensive.  When we get that instinct to say “geez, I’m sorry, I didn’t mean it that way at all,” it’s time to stop right now.  It doesn’t matter how you meant it.  It really doesn’t.  Someone doesn’t have to have racism in their heart to do something racist.  And doing something racist doesn’t make you an evil person who can never do good again, should never be an activist, should run off and hide in a hole somewhere.  It means you did something hurtful, you made a big mistake, and you need to own that mistake.  You need to say “I’m sorry.”  Full stop.  I’m sorry.  And if the person who called you out is generous enough to take time to explain what you did wrong, you need to have a seat and listen.

I’ve fucked this up plenty of times in my own life.  I’ve used social justice as a shield, to show how liberal and progressive I am.  I couldn’t possibly be a racist, right?

It doesn’t matter.  It really doesn’t matter, because all of us who couldn’t possibly be racist are doing racist things, and we need to cut it out.

We need to acknowledge that being a POC is not the only identity someone has.  POC disagree with each other, and there’s not always one big Anti-Racist Answer.  Maybe that’s hard to sort through.  Well, life is hard.  It’s not our job, as white people, to show up with “the answer.”  Again, have a seat.

We need to acknowledge that a WOC balances the identities of “woman” and “of color,” along with many other identities.  It is never okay to tell someone to set aside race while we focus on gender or feminism for a while.  Gender is informed by race.  Feminism had better fucking include anti-racism or this ship is sunk, let’s all go home.  By the way, this isn’t always blatant and obvious.  It happens when a POC raises what seems like a minor point in the language of a document, and a white leader in the group says you know, we’re really voting on the main resolution right now.  It happens when a group of mostly white feminists suggests that one of their POC members be in charge of “dealing” with a race issue.  Don’t tolerate this bullshit.

We need to acknowledge that any movement must address the needs of its most marginalized members, or any cries of elitism are absolutely true.  We need to go beyond token efforts to include POC, working class people, disabled people, immigrants, and others in our feminist movements, and when we bring marginalized voices to the table, we need to listen.  We need to accept that maybe the thing we’ve been fighting for our whole lives isn’t as important as another thing that is hurting someone else.  We need to pay attention to books written by marginalized people that aren’t part of the “canon,” and listen to their priorities.  We need to focus on prison reform, on violence against transgender sex workers of color, on what’s happening in immigration detention facilities, on the continued genocide against indigenous people in the US and all over the world.

I believe that feminism is viable, and will kick some serious ass if we stop being [ignorant] about race and other issues.  I’m launching QueerFeminism.com at the start of 2012 to focus on how to rescue this movement and redefine feminism as “radical opposition to patriarchy,” a definition that explicitly incorporates the horrors of racism and colonization.  I hope some of you will join me in that effort.

In the meantime, if you do nothing else today, white feminists, read this article by Flavia Dzodan: My Feminism Will Be Intersectional or It Will Be Bullshit.

This was interesting to read! I encourage a lively debate on the topic!

Clipped an ableist slur, the rest is spot-on.

(Source: radicallyqueer.wordpress.com)

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
Let’s make one thing clear: I’m not talking about offense. Someone takes a shit on the rug, that’s offensive. What I’m talking about is oppression. It starts small and grows into something big. Slurs, invalidation, erasure, discrimination, murder, genocide. It doesn’t matter if I’m calling out the big things or the little things; they all have the same end result. And it has nothing to do with offense.
Monday, November 21, 2011

My problem with “stupid.”

hickies-n-hotpants:

So, this will probably be short cause it’s 3:30am, but

I find it inaccurate to call someone “stupid” who is being oppressive/privilege-denying, etc because it has nothing to do with their nature, intelligence, or ability to learn.

I think calling them stupid is cutting them a BREAK and completely underestimating them by implying that they are oppressive because they are incapable of understanding the effects of their actions, which is entirely false.

They have the chance and ability like everyone else to consider how their actions and beliefs are problematic. They can talk to folks. They can ask. They can seek out education. Obviously many people do not have access to limitless academic resources or are around critical discourse on a daily basis, but that is also due to oppression. Not intelligence.

Most often, ignorance is the result of folks benefiting from another’s oppression and thus doing nothing to challenge it or acknowledge their own privilege or role in the issue. It is a choice. Which I think is immeasurably worse than a lack of understanding because it just means they’re fucking selfish.

Things I’m thinking about.

People in a position of power, who have something to lose by questioning the system that puts them in power, will do oppressive things. It’s why the patriarchy keeps its machine running, it’s why trans* people (especially women) within the cis feminist community are looked down upon, it’s why queer, trans*, and GLBT communities are racist.

None of this is about ignorance. It is about holding on to power, and using shallow defense mechanisms built into these power structures to short-circuit any capacity for thinking and empathy. Those defenses stay up not because people aren’t smart enough to see past them. It’s because they have been trained to believe they have too much to lose by allowing those thoughts to happen.

Think about this—within these broken systems of prejudice, it may be in their best interests to keep bigoted views. To break from the system is to lose the power it grants, or at the very least to lose faith in the legitimacy of the system that puts you ahead. From a purely selfish, short-term reptilian brain standpoint of “do what I must to survive”, reflecting the bigotry of the greater community is a “smart” move. To fight them openly is to ostracize yourself from a group that has granted you power. That’s why people with privilege forgive others of their kind, that’s why these systems stay in power. That’s why people defer to authority figures, even when committing acts they know are wrongfully violent.

Most people who act on bigoted beliefs are not “stupid”, are not ignorant (in the more ableist sense), and are not “mentally ill”. They are average people (or “highly intelligent” people, as much as anyone can measure intelligence) who have been taught horrible things reinforced by social systems of violence.

These judgments are made to to separate the “good” ones from the “bad” ones. Because surely us good people are not like those horrible, stupid, mentally ill bigots. But there is no special trait separating bigots from the rest of us, that keeps them bigoted and stops us from being the same way. Because we are all prejudiced on axes we have privilege. The only question is, what will it take to get a particular individual to examine this indoctrinated prejudice? To create a simplified, judgmental reason for why someone else is prejudiced is to ignore our own internalized bigotry. I’ve done it, I’m sure you’ve done it, we all do it, but the truth still stands.

Monday, November 7, 2011
When you believe that a group of people intrinsically have value equal to your own, you believe it all the time and deep in your heart. This belief is not contingent on your being in a good mood. The belief doesn’t go away when a marginalized person makes you angry or annoys you. If you have it in you to use epithets when hurt, then you have it in you all the time.

Tami from What Tami Said about Kelly Osbourne’s transphobic comments (via chotchki)

[TW at link for slurs, cissexism, transmisogyny]

(via bubonickitten)